Skip to main content

💸NEW: Share your earnings easily with iMusician's Revenue Splits💸

Find out more HERE
iMusician logo
All blog posts

A Journey Through 90s Electronic Music In 21 Tracks

Share this article on
Music Discovery: 90s Electronic Music In 21 Essential Tracks

Building on electronic music from the 70s and 80s, the 1990s were a period of innovation, creativity, and experimentation. Today, we would like to take you on a journey through 90s electronic music by sharing 21 of our favorite tracks, ranging from mainstream to underground.

The 90s in electronic music — an era of versatility

With the birth of house music in Chicago, IL, and techno in Detroit, MI, the 1970s and 1980s witnessed the emergence of numerous electronic music genres that would soon captivate the world. After gaining popularity in US- and European cities, the genres began to develop in various directions and establish themselves in places across the globe.

During the 1990s, electronic music grew highly popular, leading to the invention of many new styles and categories. Among these were the genres jungle, drum & bass, bleep, UK garage, big beat, trance, and Eurodance, all revolving around a distinctive sound. At the same time, house and techno continued to evolve, with some artists staying true to their stylistic roots and others incorporating new elements and innovative approaches.

The 90s were a time of innovation, creativity, and experimentation, further solidifying the foundations of today’s vibrant and diverse electronic music scene. Tracks ranged from futuristic to highly dynamic and emotional. To give you a taste of 90s electronic music, we would like to share some of our favorite tunes, ranging from mainstream to underground.

1. Robin S. — Show Me Love (1993)

Released in 1993, ‘Show Me Love’ by Robin S. is one of the UK’s most widely known and recognized house music tracks. Featuring an engaging groove, versatile production, and Robin’s remarkable voice, it undoubtedly deserves to be featured on our list.

Please accept marketing cookies to view this content.

2. Jeff Mills — The Bells (1996)

Next comes a Detroit classic produced by Jeff Mills, one of the most influential artists in the history of techno music. ‘The Bells’ was released in 1996 and remains a favorite among techno enthusiasts.

Please accept marketing cookies to view this content.

3. Drexciya — Aqua Worm Hole (1993)

Speaking about Detroit techno, we highly recommend checking out ‘Aqua Worm Hole’ by the legendary duo Drexciya. The track features immersive, aquatic sounds and a dynamic blend of energies, capturing the essence of Drexciya's distinctive sound.

Please accept marketing cookies to view this content.

4. Daft Punk — Around the World (1997)

‘Around the World’ by the French duo Daft Punk is widely acknowledged as one of the most iconic 90s electronic music tracks, known even among those less familiar with the genre. Released in 1997, the song became a major club hit, charting in multiple countries and making it into numerous best-of rankings.

Please accept marketing cookies to view this content.

5. Sonique — It Feels So Good (1998)

In 1998, British DJ, singer, and producer Sonique released her single ‘It Feels So Good.’ With its dynamic production and Sonique’s expressive voice, the song quickly made it into the charts, where it remained for fourteen weeks.

Please accept marketing cookies to view this content.

6. Plastikman — Plasticity (1993)

‘Plasticity,’ a minimal techno track by the British-Canadian producer and DJ Richie Hartwin, aka Plastikman, undoubtedly deserves a spot on our list. The track perfectly encapsulates the minimalistic approach toward techno that became popular during the 90s in Detroit and Berlin.

Please accept marketing cookies to view this content.

7. Marc Kinchen / Never On Sunday — The Journey (1991)

Released in 1991 under the Detroit label Retroactive, ‘The Journey’ by Marc Kinchen / Never On Sunday is an ethereal blend of techno and deep house. While somewhat lesser known, it is certainly worth a listen.

Please accept marketing cookies to view this content.

8. K-Hand — Global Warning (1994)

Released on her label, Acacia Records, “Global Warning” showcases Kelli Hand’s talent and skills as a music producer. As the First Lady of Detroit Techno and renowned DJ, her contributions to the genre solidified her as one of the most influential techno music artists.

Please accept marketing cookies to view this content.

9. The Prodigy — Firestarter (1996)

‘Firestarter’ by The Prodigy belongs to the most outstanding 90s electronic music tracks to come out of the UK. The song achieved international chart success and earned a place in numerous best-of lists. Its genre is somewhat contested, with some categorizing it as big beat, while others classify it as breakbeat.

Please accept marketing cookies to view this content.

10. Lhasa — The Attic (1990)

Building on the stylistic characteristics of the 80s, much of the electronic music released during the 90s is distinguished by its futuristic yet ethereal sound. 'The Attic' by Lhasa perfectly illustrates how producers of the era drew inspiration from technology and futuristic themes. Make sure to give it a listen.

Please accept marketing cookies to view this content.

11. Bochum Welt — Radiopropulsive (1996)

Looking for more futuristic music? ‘Radiopropulsive’ by Italian electronic musician Bochum Welt may be the right choice. The track stands out for its sound selection — immersive yet futuristic plucks, bouncy synths, a soft pad in the background, and a subtle, rumbling bass. Released in 1996, the track falls into the genre IDM, a substyle of electronic music that developed during the 1990s.

Please accept marketing cookies to view this content.

12. Snap! — Rhythm Is A Dancer (1992)

Another iconic 90s track is ‘Rhythm Is A Dancer,’ produced by the German Eurodance group Snap! Featuring vocals by US-American singer Thea Austin, the song quickly became an international success. It even reached the top five on the US Billboard Hot 100 charts.

Please accept marketing cookies to view this content.

13. LFO — LFO (Leeds Warehouse Mix) (1991)

With its minimal, experimental, robotic, yet groovy feel, ‘LFO (Leeds Warehouse mix)’ by the duo LFO is a perfect example of how the sound of the genres bleep and IDM is encapsulated.

Please accept marketing cookies to view this content.

14. Hardrive — Deep Inside (1993)

‘Deep Inside’ by Hardrive is another classic in house and garage music. It is based on multiple samples from Barbara Tucker’s ‘Beautiful People’ and has been remixed many times.

Please accept marketing cookies to view this content.

15. UK Apachi & Shy FX — Original Nuttah (1994)

Previously featured in our article on jungle, drum & bass, and breakbeat, ‘Original Nuttah’ by UK Apachi & Shy FX stands out as a widely recognized track within the jungle genre. The track was one of the first jungle records to become a top 40 chart hit in the UK.

Please accept marketing cookies to view this content.

16. Origin Unknown — Valley Of The Shadows (1992)

‘Valley Of The Shadows’ is another classic from the drum and bass and jungle genres. It is often described as one of the greatest, most defining tunes within these genres.

Please accept marketing cookies to view this content.

17. Mental Cube — Q (1991)

‘Q’ is a single released in 1990/1991 by Mental Cube. It falls into the genres of techno and bleep and has a distinctive, futuristic, and immersive feel. The track is widely known among DJs and electronic music enthusiasts and deserves to be featured on our list.

Please accept marketing cookies to view this content.

18. Glass Domain — Interlock

Ever heard a song about Lego blocks? If you haven’t, here is your chance. Produced by the legendary Gerald Donald and released under the artist name Glass Domain, the track ‘Interlock’ is a unique blend of synthpop, electro, techno, and even some elements that could be interpreted as dark wave.

Please accept marketing cookies to view this content.

19. Dem 2 — Destiny

‘Destiny’ by Dem 2 is a classic within the UK garage scene. Featuring a distinctive blend of syncopated beats, soulful vocals, and chopped-up samples, it significantly influenced the development of the subgenre.

Please accept marketing cookies to view this content.

20. Aphex Twin — Windowlicker (1999)

‘Windowlicker’ by Aphex Twin is an excellent example of the artist’s experimental, boundaryless style and approach to music production. Its unique sound and complex rhythms make it a seminal track within 90s electronic music, influencing many other artists to pursue experimental approaches.

Please accept marketing cookies to view this content.

21. Darude — Sandstorm (1999)

Finally, we decided to feature ‘Sandstorm,’ a trance/eurodance track released in 1999 by Finnish DJ and producer Darude. It gained widespread popularity in the early 2000s due to its use in memes, silly videos, and as a go-to response to inquiries about song titles. This unique context has solidified the track as iconic in its own right.

Please accept marketing cookies to view this content.

Ready to get your music out there?

Distribute your music to the widest range of streaming platforms and shops worldwide. 

Get Started
Share Post:
Share this article on
Always stay up-to-date

All You Need.
All in One Place.

Get tips on How to Succeed as an Artist, receive Music Distribution Discounts, and get the latest iMusician news sent straight to your inbox! Everything you need to grow your music career.

Always stay up-to-date

All You Need.
All in One Place.

Get tips on How to Succeed as an Artist, receive Music Distribution Discounts, and get the latest iMusician news sent straight to your inbox! Everything you need to grow your music career.

Loading...